суббота, 6 октября 2012 г.

Research from University of Calgary, Department of Community Health Sciences yields new data on pediatric in children. - Health & Medicine Week

Investigators publish new data in the report 'A community-based physical activity program for adolescents with cancer (project TREK): program feasibility and preliminary findings.' According to recent research from Calgary, Canada, 'As the number of pediatric survivors continues to grow, a greater emphasis is being placed on identifying long-term health risk/protecting behaviors. The primary purpose of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility of a theoretically-based physical activity (PA) intervention in adolescents with cancer.'

'A group PA intervention was administered to participants over 16 weeks. Program attendance/adherence, total PA, physical fitness, and quality of life (QOL) were assessed at 5 different intervals over the 1-year study duration. Over a period of 6 weeks, 11 adolescents responded to recruitment efforts. Ten ultimately enrolled and completed the 1-year study. Overall, the program was well received with attendance over the 16-week intervention averaging 81.5%. Although improvements in total PA, physical fitness, and QOL were noted across the intervention, follow-up data revealed that participants failed to maintain their postintervention PA levels at both the 3 and 12-month follow-up assessments. Adolescents with a history of cancer are undoubtedly susceptible to the same maladaptive health habits as are their healthy peers. Innovative interventions aimed at improving their adherence to positive behavioral interventions, such as PA are warranted,' wrote M.R. Keats and colleagues, University of Calgary, Department of Community Health Sciences (see also Life Sciences).

The researchers concluded: 'Although not without limitations, this study provides preliminary data in support of a university-sponsored PA intervention.'

Keats and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Pediatric Hematology (A community-based physical activity program for adolescents with cancer (project TREK): program feasibility and preliminary findings. Journal of Pediatric Hematology, 2008;30(4):272-80).

For additional information, contact M.R. Keats, University of Calgary, University of Calgary, Dept. of Community Health Sciences, Calgary, Canada.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Pediatric Hematology is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

Keywords: Canada, Calgary, Life Sciences, Pediatric Hematology, Cancer, Oncology, Quality of Life, Exercise, Physical Fitness, Community Health, Behavior.

This article was prepared by Health & Medicine Week editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2008, Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com.