четверг, 20 сентября 2012 г.

New findings reported from University of Pennsylvania describe advances in developmental and behavioral pediatrics.(Report) - Pediatrics Week

'Two strategies have been proposed for early identification of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD): (1) using a general screening tool followed by an ASD-specific screening tool for those who screen positive on the former or (2) using an ASD-specific tool for all children. The relative yield of these two strategies has not been examined,' scientists in the United States report.

'This study compared the number of children identified at risk for ASD at their well child visits between the ages of 18 and 30 months using a general developmental screening tool and an autism-specific screening tool. The Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS) was used as the general developmental screening tool and the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) was used as the autism-specific tool. These tools were administered concurrently to 152 children. Cross tabulations and chi(2) tests were used to determine the utility of the PEDS as the first step of a two-part screen for ASD. Of those who screened positive for developmental concerns on the PEDS (n = 38),16% screened positive for ASD on the M-CHAT; of those who did not screen positive for developmental concerns on the PEDS (n = 114),14% screened positive for ASD on the M-CHAT (p =.79). The PEDS missed the majority of children who screened positive for ASD on the M-CHAT, suggesting that these two tools tap into very different domains of developmental concerns,' wrote J.A. Pintomartin and colleagues, University of Pennsylvania.

The researchers concluded: 'The findings support the use of an ASD-specific tool for all children in conjunction with regular standardized developmental screening.'

Pintomartin and colleagues published their study in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (Screening Strategies for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Pediatric Primary Care. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 2008;29(5):345-350).

For more information, contact J.A. Pintomartin, University of Pennsylvania, School Nursing, Biobehavioral & Health Science Division, 418 Curie Blvd., Room 436, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

Keywords: United States, Philadelphia, Life Sciences, Behavioral Pediatrics, Developmental Disabilities, Neurology, Autism, Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania.

This article was prepared by Pediatrics Week editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2008, Pediatrics Week via NewsRx.com.